How To Make A Homemade Lavender Hydrosol

Homemade Lavender Hydrosol Tutorial | Growing Up Herbal | Learn how to make and use a homemade lavender hydrosol for better health!

I’ve been using herbs for 10 years now, and I’ve never made a homemade hydrosol of any kind. Can you believe it?

Sure I’ve bought hydrosols and used them in DIY skin care products before, but I’ve never actually made my own hydrosol from scratch. I suppose I had preconceived ideas about homemade hydrosols. I either thought they were too difficult to make at home or that they would be of low-quality if I made them myself. Thankfully, after doing a bit more research on hydrosols, my confidence in homemade versions has increased, and I’ve been inspired to start making my own when I need them.

BTW, have you ever priced a yarrow hydrosol? Gasp! Talk about expensive! Making your own homemade version is totally worth it!

Today, I want to show you how to make your very own homemade lavender hydrosol in the comfort of your own home. Lavender is one of the most readily available herbs there is which makes this an inexpensive hydrosol to make. Plus, it can be used in so many ways. Lavender is very versatile! 

What Is A Hydrosol 

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A hydrosol is a milky looking water that results from steam-distilling herbs. This water not only contains small amounts of essential oil but also the water-soluble properties of the plant material. 

Hydrosols are very safe for most people, and they can be used in a lot of different ways ranging from linen spray, to the liquid portion of skin care products, as a facial toner, in baths, as a body spray, and more. They are commonly used externally, but they can be used internally as well.

One thing I recently learned about hydrosols was that they have a relatively long shelf-life compared to most water-based products. Most hydrosols have a shelf-life of 18-24 months, depending on the herb, of course, and as usual, refrigeration can extend the shelf-life. 

How To Make A Homemade Lavender Hydrosol

Homemade Lavender Hydrosol Tutorial | Growing Up Herbal | Learn how to make and use a homemade lavender hydrosol for better health!

To make your homemade lavender hydrosol, start by gathering your supplies.

You’ll need:

  • a large pot (I use my stainless steel stock pot)
  • trivet (a heat-stable bowl, large rock, or brick will work too)
  • bowl
  • 10-ounces of fresh lavender by weight (5-ounces of dried lavender)
  • 3 quarts of distilled water
  • ice (lots of ice!)

Homemade Lavender Hydrosol Tutorial | Growing Up Herbal | Learn how to make and use a homemade lavender hydrosol for better health!

Next, place the trivet inside your pot and place the herbs and water around the trivet, making sure to saturate the herbs (especially if using dried herbs) well. Place your bowl on the trivet in the center of the pot. This will be where your finished hydrosol will collect.

Homemade Lavender Hydrosol Tutorial | Growing Up Herbal | Learn how to make and use a homemade lavender hydrosol for better health!

Next, flip your lid upside-down and put it on the pot. Add ice to the lid, and turn the heat on medium-high. The heat at the bottom of the pan will cause the water and herbs to heat up, releasing steam (and your house will start to smell amazing!). When the hot steam hits the cold lid, it will cause the steam to condensate on the lid. This condensation is your hydrosol. Because the lid is upside-down, the condensation will drip into your bowl. It’s nice to have a little helper working to collect water during this process, but if you want to avoid a melted water mess, put your ice in a gallon sized plastic baggie and swap it out for a new one when all the ice melts. 

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After 20 minutes, you should have a good amount of hydrosol collected in your bowl. CAREFULLY remove the lid and set aside. CAREFULLY remove your bowl and transfer your finished hydrosol to a glass measuring cup or anything that makes it easier to pour. Finally, pour your hydrosol into a jar for storage. Be sure to label and store your jar properly.

How To Use A Lavender Hydrosol

Your homemade lavender hydrosol will have a lot of the same therapeutic properties the herb has.

Lavender hydrosols can be used to:

  • relieve mild pain
  • discourage microbial growth
  • decrease inflammation
  • cool the skin
  • calm the mind
  • stimulate digestion
  • thin mucous in the lungs
  • relax the body
  • stimulate energy
  • and more.

Keep in mind that most herbs work gently to bring the body back into a state of balance. For example, if you have a fever and your body is tense and hot, lavender hydrosol can help calm the mind, relax the body, and bring cooling to the surface of the skin. On the other hand, if you lack energy, lavender hydrosol can bring warmth and stimulation to the mind and body. This may seem contradictory, but the more you learn about herbs and how they work, you’ll see how they work best to center and balance the body when it’s off.

Homemade Lavender Hydrosol Tutorial | Growing Up Herbal | Learn how to make and use a homemade lavender hydrosol for better health!

One of the easiest ways to use your lavender hydrosol will be to put it in a bottle with a spray cap. You can then use them anytime you are cleaning a cut or scrape, when your child gets a bug bite, to spritz on your sheets before bed, to clean the makeup off your face, to cool a burn, to clean baby’s diaper area, and so much more. 

As you can see, a homemade lavender hydrosol has a lot of different uses!

So there you go! I hope you’ve enjoyed this homemade lavender hydrosol tutorial, and I hope it gives you the confidence to try making one on your own. 

 

If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment in the comment section below, and be sure to check out this year’s Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle for more info on how you can live a more healthy, natural lifestyle!

38 thoughts on “How To Make A Homemade Lavender Hydrosol”

  1. Hi, Meagan,
    May I use rose petals that are ready to be tossed (old) to make my Rose Hydrosol?

    1. You certainly can, Jean, but keep in mind that your hydrosol may not have as many beneficial properties as one made with newer rose petals.

    1. Professionally made hydrosols usually have a shelf-life of a year in the fridge. Homemade versions will probably be a bit shorter, but not too much. If it starts getting cloudy or moldy, throw it out. Otherwise, it should be good for 6-12 months when stored in the fridge.

    1. I think I got around 8-10 ounces from this. I haven’t made it for a while, but I’m close to running out so the next time I make it, I’ll pay attention to how much it yields and update the post. Thanks for your comment, Heather!

    1. You could, but I’m not sure it would be as strong as it would be if you used lavender buds as that is where the majority of the volatile oils are located. If you’re okay with that possibility, I’m sure it would be very useful and smell lovely!

    1. I would think so, as far as making a hydrosol goes. You may want to chop the peel or grate it first in order to better release some of the oils, though. I’ve personally never tried it so I’d love to hear how it goes for you if you do it.

  2. Rose Lynn Scott

    In making lavender hydrosol do you use flowers only or are the leaves good for making something… They are pretty fragrant on their own

  3. Pingback: Healing Waters; The Wonders of Hydrosols ~ Locusts & Honey

  4. Found this today – was looking up what a Hydrosol was – thank you for the fantastic post – I am going to use it to make a shampoo for my little fur baby who has started to lick her feet – now must just find a lavender plant.

    1. So glad it was helpful, Maria, and good luck making your shampoo with it. That’s a great idea, and I think I’ll try it the next time I make some!

    1. I get that, but you’re not really wasting them. You’ve pulled the majority of their water-soluble benefits into your hydrosol so there’s not much left in the flowers themselves. One thing I like to do with leftover herbs from water or oil infusions is to compost them so they can break down and my plants benefit from them. At least that way you’re not just throwing them away. Hope that helps!

  5. my lavender water is an amber color. did i do something incorrectly?
    also, the water that is not in the bowl but in the pit with the lavender flowers, do i just discard that?
    Thanks!

    1. Meagan Visser

      Hmm, I’m not sure. Mine has always been a cloudy-white color, but I would imagine the longer you keep it over heat, the more color comes into the liquid. I wouldn’t throw it away, though. I’d still use it. If you make a new batch, and it turns out the same way, it could have something to do with the type of lavender you are using that’s giving it more color.

  6. Meagan, thank you for making this post. I thought hydrosols would be difficult but this looks so simple. I have several lavender bushes that need trimming yearly (they are very happy) and I can’t GIVE it away. I guess people are too busy to care. I’m slowly discovering uses for it. I throw some Spanish lavender in our chicken coop. The English lavender I have made into wands. Now I can make hydrosol! My skin gets flushed, so this may be a good spray. How do you use it to remove make up? What’s your process?

    1. I don’t really use it to remove makeup as I’ve found soap-based cleaners to work better for me. Rather I use it as a toner after removing my makeup. I also use it as a setting spray after I’ve put my makeup on or anytime my face feels dry. I like to use it as a linen spray on my bed at night or even to spritz in your car to freshen the smell. I also use it as the water portion when I make body creams from time to time. Hope that helps!

  7. Hi Megan,
    Before I saw your recipe I made some lavendar hydrosol but failed to put the ice on top of the lid. It seemed okay to use, but I am wondering if I would get a better product using the ice.

    1. I’m sure it’s fine, Jo. I think the ice just helps to speed things up. Maybe try it with ice next time and see how long it takes you compared to not using ice.

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